The One Thing that Makes Finding the Right College a Little Easier

Will you be having the celebration or the heartache on the menu today?

For students who apply to multiple colleges around the country, the process inevitably means visiting many campuses, writing multiple essays, and submitting long applications. When the acceptance letters come—or the rejection notifications—it can feel like a party or like you're the only one who didn't get an invite.

Gracie, an intelligent, hard-working, altruistic college-bound senior, says it’s easy to get caught up in comparisons. After all, it makes sense to imagine oneself at a particular school—to fall in love before the proposal. Gracie, whose bright eyes and contagious warmth are second nature, was more serious when she contemplated the real feelings seniors face around college acceptance, “No two people have the same path to finding their school, so you shouldn’t compare yourself to others. A myriad of factors go into the decision, and comparing your qualifications to...

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Should you visit a college before or after you're accepted?


To visit or not to visit?

When it comes to applying to colleges across the country, every senior and their family has a strategy. For Emma, waiting to visit colleges after she received acceptances just felt practical. After all, she spent the summer before her senior year working a paid internship with Intel and writing her common application essay. Between writing more supplements, playing volleyball, and juggling her honors classes in the fall, letting the college acceptances introduce and eliminate her real options gave her just a bit of breathing room.

But when Emma received acceptances into honors colleges from Oregon to Vermont and more acceptances from schools like Boston University and Brandeis, she felt more confused than ever. 

With merit scholarships ranging from $6000 (UO and OSU) to $20,000 (Brandeis) to $23,000 (UVT) per year, and the WUE scholarship at Colorado State, she didn't know how to pick. “After hearing back from all my schools, I wasn’t...

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How writing confidence translates to college acceptance

When Talya began applying for schools in the fall of 2018, she was far ahead of most of her peers. And that’s not only because she chose to apply early.

Talya is a parent’s dream. She operates on plans, checklists, note-taking, spreadsheets, and networking. If it’s important, Talya has seen it coming and she’s working on a strategy. These tactics are not new acquisitions either.

Talya, who grew up competing in sports, elected to attend a rigorous private high school, has volunteered hundreds of hours to Youthline, a crisis helpline with teen to teen support, and even sat on the Planned Parenthood Council before she was 18, is well practiced in getting her ship in order and aiming her sails at the high seas.

As she toured schools, tried on majors, and devoted herself to passionate causes, there was just one little thing (okay, it’s kind of a big thing) that kept Talya awake at night, worried that she might not be accepted into her dream school. That...

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